Abdominal Care

Acid Reflux or GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) is caused when the valve between the esophagus and stomach becomes weak. Normally, this valve opens to allow food in and then it shuts tightly. With GERD, the valve stays open, allowing stomach acids to flow back up into the esophagus, causing heartburn and many other symptoms. It leads to a condition in which the liquid content of the stomach regurgitates (backs up or refluxes) into the esophagus. If you have heartburn that occurs more than twice a week and/or does not get better with over-the-counter antacids, you may have GERD.

Causes

Consumption of pitta (fire) aggravating foods and foods of incompatible nature (virudh aahar) vitiates all the doshas, predominantly pitta dosha. Vitiated doshas produce heating toxins that are expelled upwards into the food pipe causing heartburn. Increased intake of tea or coffee, or oily, spicy, or fried foods aggravates pitta and leads to acidity. An aggressive nature and hyperactivity are also causal factors. Pitta is aggravated by late night work schedules, irregular eating patterns, and/or drinking alcoholic and carbonated beverages. Increased intake of painkillers and antibiotics also cause acidity and heartburn.

Symptoms

  • Chest pain
  • Heartburn
  • Pain while swallowing food

 

Ayurvedic View

According to Ayurveda, Acid Reflux is a result of aggravation of pitta Dosha. Pitta is an Ayurvedic humor that symbolizes heat or fire. It is hot, sharp, intense, acidic and pungent in nature and is located in the stomach. Aggravated pittaleads to increase of acidic content in stomach fluids. Actually, the reflux of the stomach’s liquid contents into the esophagus occurs in most normal individuals. In such patients, refluxed liquid contains acid more often due to aggravated pitta, which leads to acid reflux.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Avoid tea, coffee, and carbonated or alcoholic beverages.
  • Avoid processed and fermented foods.
  • Avoid using garlic, ginger, onions, tomatoes, and vinegar in cooking.
  • Also avoid rich gravies, sour, salty, and spicy foods.
  • Curd should be strictly avoided.
  • Take meals in a relaxed atmosphere at regular intervals.
  • Practice Yoga and Pranayama such as Vajrasana, Bhujangasana, Salabhasana, Bhastrika Pranayama, Shitali Pranayama and Shitkari Pranayama.

Gastritis means inflammation of the mucus lining of the stomach. Patients suffering from chronic Gastritis feel uneasy and uncomfortable during most of the day, and might also experience a persistent feeling of weakness.

Causes

The main causative factors of chronic Gastritis include excessive consumption of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, sour, spicy, acidic foods and white flour products. Stress, anger and exposure to heat also lead to the aggravation of this condition.

Symptoms

  • Indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Hiccups
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Dark stools
  • Heartburn
  • Loss of appetite

Ayurvedic View

In Ayurveda, the condition of Chronic Gastritis is known as Urdhvaga Amla Pitta. It is primarily caused by an aggravation of Pitta Dosha (Ayurvedic humor representing Fire), which happens due to improper dietary habits and excessive consumption of alcohol or tobacco. Aggravated Pitta impairs the body’s digestive fire, leading to improper digestion of food and production of ama (toxins). Due to aggravated Pitta, this ama becomes heating in nature. This heating ama gets accumulated in the body and increases the levels of gases in the stomach, causing the condition of Gastritis.

Ayurvedic treatment of Chronic Gastritis involves the reduction of aggravated body energies and the restoration of the digestive fire using cooling herbal preparations and Pitta-pacifying diet. Ayurvedic techniques of reducing tension and stress are also proven to be effective in treating this condition.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Patients suffering from Gastritis should fast for one or two days.
  • They may be given warm water or juicy fruits such as grapes, apples, oranges, water melons, etc. during these days.
  • The main idea is to detoxify the stomach by flushing out toxins.
  • Stay away from coffee and carbonated or alcoholic beverages.
  • Avoid processed and fermented foods.
  • Also avoid rich gravies, sour, salty, and spicy foods.
  • Do some amount of exercising daily; practicing Pranayama can be helpful.
  • Drink at least 8-9 glasses of water in a day. Water will relax the stomach and clear all the toxins accumulated inside.

Jaundice is a condition where the skin and the whites of the eyes take on a yellow tint. Modern medicine does not consider it to be a disease but a symptom of liver disorders like liver infection, gallstones and cirrhosis of liver. In Ayurveda, Jaundice is known as Kamala.

Causes

Increased intake of oily, spicy, sour, salty, alkaline, penetrating and very hot foods; alcohol; and sesame oil cause Pitta (Ayurvedic humor representing Fire) aggravation. The aggravated Pitta then impairs the blood and the muscle tissue of the liver, causing blockage in the channels of the liver and thus Pitta (in the form of bile) is thrown back into the blood leading to discoloration of the eyes and skin. Sleeping in the daytime, excessive physical work, overindulgence in sexual activity, suppressing the natural urges of the body, and psychological factors like lust, fear, anger, and stress can also be causative factors in cases of Jaundice.

Symptoms

  • Drowsiness
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Yellowish discoloration of the eyes, skin and nail
  • Flatulence
  • Lack of appetite
  • Burning sensation in the body
  • Low-grade fever
  • Indigestion
  • Excessive thirst
  • Loss of libido

Ayurvedic View

Ayurvedic treatment of Jaundice involves pacifying aggravated body energies using herbs that stimulate the function of the liver and increase the flow of bile in the bile duct. Digestion is also restored with the help of a customized diet plan to ensure efficient metabolism.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Avoid hot, spicy, oily, and heavy foods; eat a vegetarian diet.
  • Avoid refined flour, polished rice (white rice), mustard oil, mustard seeds, asafetida, peas, canned and preserved foods, cakes, pastries, chocolates, alcoholic beverages, and aerated drinks.
  • Increase intake of whole-wheat flour, brown rice or parboiled rice, mangoes, bananas, tomatoes, spinach, potatoes, Indian gooseberries (amla), grapes, radishes, lemons, dried dates, raisins, almonds, and cardamom.
  • Avoid unnecessary exercise and stressful conditions such as anxiety or anger.
  • Take complete rest.
  • Avoid working under the sun or near boilers and furnaces.

Inability to completely evacuate the bowels or passing very hard stools is known as Constipation or Vibandh in Ayurveda. This prevalent problem is due to an incorrect lifestyle and poor eating patterns. Although constipation is often looked upon as a common problem, if not treated or if treatment is delayed, it can lead to further problems such as fissures, fistulas, piles, lack of appetite and indigestion.

Causes

The basic cause is weak digestive power that results from irregular and incorrect eating patterns, not taking in enough fluids, taking a diet that is low in fiber, a sedentary lifestyle, and bowel evacuation habits that are poor. These all lead to incomplete digestion of the food, which is not expelled by the intestines and causes the formation of ama (mucus). Foods that are heavy and difficult to digest, as well as oily, spicy, fried, and junk foods are the culprits. Eating food in a disturbed atmosphere or in front of the television and being awake late at night all lead to bowel disturbance. Psychological factors like stress, anxiety, fear, jealousy, and sorrow also play an important role.

Symptoms

  • Indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Nausea
  • Flatulence
  • Pain at the anus while defecating
  • Heaviness of body
  • Lack of appetite
  • Acid eructation (belching)

Ayurvedic View

According to Ayurveda, undigested food and occult stool slowly accumulate in the stomach and large intestines respectively and impair Vata Dosha, resulting in obstruction of the digestive tract. When the digestive tract is not clear, the body will not be able to facilitate proper bowel movement, thereby leading to the condition of constipation.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Increase intake of fiber, especially fruits and cooked vegetables.
  • An apple or banana each day is helpful. Bananas should be ripe (bright yellow.
  • Drink 7-8 glasses of water each day, preferably lukewarm in winters and room -temperature water in summers.
  • Have a mid-morning soup, preferably prepared with spinach and tomato.
  • Take daily morning and evening walks for at least 20-30 minutes each.
  • Eat whole grains and nuts.
  • Avoid removing bran from the flour because the bran is an insoluble fiber that clears off the intestines and relieves constipation.
  • Avoid refined foods like white flour, bread, pasta, pizza, white rice, etc.
  • High -protein foods like cheese, red meat, and soybeans can cause constipation, so these must be taken with a bowl of salad and lots of liquids.
  • Meat is constipating and should be avoided.
  • Disturbing psychological factors should be removed, and meals should be taken in a relaxed and calm atmosphere.
  • The food should be warm and freshly -prepared, as cold and stale food slows down the digestive power.
  • Having excessively cold food like ice cream or chilled drinks reduces the bowel movement.

Having at least three loose motions in 24 hours in called diarrhoea in modern science. Diarrhoea is a very common problem affecting all age groups at one time or another. Though it can be managed well in most of the cases, sometimes it proves detrimental. Epidemics of diarrhoea are seen in all parts of world. In Ayurveda, diarrhoea is called Atisaar.

Causes

Diarrhoea is most commonly caused by the infections of bacteria, viruses and parasites in digestive system. These microbes generally enter the digestive system through infected food, water, milk, flesh or other eatables. Diseases like cholera and typhoid also cause diarrohea. Non-infectious conditions that can cause diarrhoea are inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, intestinal allergies, intolerance to lactose or gluten and hyperthyroidism.

Symptoms

  • Multiple loose, watery motions
  • Cramps in abdomen
  • Reduction in urine quantity
  • Bleeding with stools (in some cases)
  • Burning of anus (in some cases)
  • Low BP (in some cases)

Ayurvedic View

According to Ayurveda, weak gastric fire, improper food, impure water, toxins and mental stress usually cause atisaar. Aggravatede vata pulls down the fluid part from various tissues of the body and brings it into the intestine. There this fluid mixes with the stool which then leads to loose, watery motions. Depending upon which particular Dosha is vitiated, atisaar has been classified into Vataj, Pittaj, Kaphaj, Sannipatik, Bhayaj and Shokaj types in Ayurveda. Vataj atisaar (caused mainly by vitiated Vayu) is marked by painful loose motions with sounds & foam, gases and cramps. Pittaj atisaar (caused mainly by vitiated Pitta) causes motions with burning sensation at anus, offensive odour and varying colours like green, red, blue. Thirst, giddiness, sweating and fever are often present. Kaphaj atisaar (caused mainly by vitiated Kapha) shows sticky, oily, whitish motions with foul odour, nausea, lazy feeling and excess sleep. Sannipatik atisaar is caused by vitiation of all three Doshas and therefore have mixed characteristics. Bhayaj and Shokaj atisaar are caused by fear and grief respectively.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Sufficient intake of water and liquid foods is always adviced in diarrhoea.
  • Light, easy to digest food articles such as liquid rice, porridge are recommended. Soups made from lentils are also good in diarrhoea. Fruits like sweet lime, oranges, apple, melons are allowed.
  • Heavy, spicy, fried food is prohibited. Non-veg items, eggs are also not allowed. Sugarcane juice is also forbidden.
  • Water is adviced to be boiled before drinking.
  • While goat milk is more recommended, cow’s milk may also be allowed. Buffelo milk is however forbidden. Mother’s milk is however always allowed.

The difference between dysentery and diarrhoea is presence on tenesmus in the former. While the frequency of motions increases in both the disorders, in dysentery the patient needs to apply force to evacuate his bowels. This is called tenesmus. Dysentery is compared with the disease pravahika described in Ayurveda.

Causes

Dysentery is caused either by bacilli Shigella dysenteriae (called bacillary dysentery) or by parasite Entamoeba histolytica (called amoebic dysentery). These organisms usually enter the human body through contaminated foods, water and milk. Poor sanitation and uncleanlines usually provide conducive environment for their spread.

Symptoms

  • Fever
  • Abdominal pain
  • Frequent motions with tenesmus
  • Blood & mucus in stool

 

Ayurvedic View

The name Pravahika (as dysentery is referred to in Ayurveda) comes from the word ‘pravahan’ which means tenesmus. According to Ayurveda, pravahika is caused by vitiated kapha and vata doshas. Kapha aggravated in stomach is pulled down by the aggravated vata into the intestines. This makes the stools sticky and so the body needs to push hard to evacuate the bowels and eliminate the sticky stools. Depending upon which particular Dosha is vitiated, atisaar has been classified into Vataj, Pittaj, Kaphaj, and Raktaj types in Ayurveda. Vataj pravahika (caused mainly by vitiated Vayu) is marked by painful stikcy motions with foam. Pittaj pravahika (caused mainly by vitiated Pitta) causes motions with burning sensation at anus and thirst. Kaphaj pravahika (caused mainly by vitiated Kapha) shows sticky, oily, whitish motions and lazy feeling. Raktaj pravahika is marked by blood stained stools.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Light, easy to digest food articles such as liquid rice, porridge are recommended. Soups made from lentils are also good in diarrhoea. Fruits like sweet lime, oranges, melons are allowed.
  • Heavy, spicy, fried food is prohibited. Non-veg items, eggs are also not allowed. Sugarcane juice is also forbidden.
  • Water is adviced to be boiled before drinking.

When food is not digested properly, due to low jathragni, and most of the food is not converted into nutritious juice required for the sustenance of the body, it forms the mucus like substance which is ‘apakv ahar’. Very little of this substance gets converted in nutritious juice while a large part of it is converted into waste products. This excess of waste causes aggravation of vata, which disrupts the normal functioning of the digestive canal thus producing (ama) in the body. Ama is the toxin caused by undigested food. When dhatus (tissues) are produced from this defective nutritious juice, there is an aggravation of kapha and pitta in them. This results in bad quality of tissues/organs and low immunity.

Signs of proper digestion

No acid eructation. Feeling of strength and energy to work again. No difficulty in passing urine or stool. Feeling of lightness in the body, despite eating. Feeling hungry again at the right time of the next meal.

Signs of improper digestion

Lethargy Heaviness in the body and stomach. Vertigo. Constipation or diarrhea. Reversed direction of vata. Distention.

Causes

Eating before the earlier meal is digested, eating too much, eating heavy foods, eating irregularly, eating very hot or very cold food, eating too much drying food, eating without giving a thought to quantity and the compatibility of the food, eating food which is not suited to the climate/season or body is often responsible for indigestion.

Holding irrepressible urges, drinking too much water, working late nights or not getting proper rest, mental factors like Anxiety/ fear/anger/sickness/sorrow etc also contribute in causing indigestion.

Symptoms

  • Vertigo
  • Excess yawning
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Stiffness in back and lumber region
  • Pain in body
  • Thirst
  • Anorexia
  • Vomiting
  • Bloated or distended abdomen
  • Nausea

 

Ayurvedic View

Pathogenesis:

Due to improper lifestyle/diet and mental causes (listed above), jathragni becomes low and the food is not digested properly because of aggravation of kapha and vata dosha. The water content increases and dilutes the digestive juices and they can not act properly on the food, which causes indigestion.

Types of Ajirna:

Amajirna: When there is excess kapha accumulation in the stomach. Digestive acids or pachak pitta is then diluted and its potency is reduced, resulting in inappropriate digestion.

Vidagdhajirna: Due to aggravation of pitta, the acids helpful in digestion are released in a larger quantity than required and acidify the food present in the stomach. The acidified food does not get digested properly.

Vishtabdhajirna: This situation is caused due to aggravation of vata. This results in either drying up or improper release of the digestive juices, causing only a part of the food be digested. The patient has symptoms like pricking pain, bloating, unnatural abdominal sounds and false urge to pass motions.

Rasseshajirna: Rasseshajirna is the situation when, after the digestion of the maximum food, some undigested matter remains in the nutritious juice. Patient feels heaviness in abdomen and does not feel hungry again at the right time of the meal again.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

General guidelines for diet:

Strict attention to diet is essential for recovery.

  • Starchy, protein and fatty foods should be restricted.
  • Meats, sugar, tea, coffee, condiments, pickles, refined and processed foods should be avoided.
  • White flour and white sugar products should be avoided.
  • Heavy gravies, puddings, cakes, chocolates, pastries and alcohol should be avoided. Soft drinks, candies, ice creams and products made with sugar and white flour should also be avoided.
  • Non-vegetarian foods should be avoided.
  • Rice can be eaten with steamed vegetables, which should be garnished with spices. Khichari also should be used.
  • Pomegranate fruit, buttermilk, soup of reddish are beneficial.

Tips for improving digestion:

  • A very simple way to improve digestion is to give up the habit of eating too much. Try to regulate eating hours and always leave part of the stomach empty for movement of food during digestion.
  • Eat fresh and natural foods. Avoid preserved, canned, or fast foods.
  • Never suppress natural urges, such as passing urine, stool or flatus, sneezing, belching, yawning, and even crying. Suppression of such urges aggravates toxins in the body.
  • Create regular meal times. Maintain at least 4 hours of interval between two meals.
  • Eat dinner before 2 hours of sleeping. Take a walk after dinner.

Dietary guidelines:

  • Consume food in proper quantity.
  • Eat when you are hungry.
  • Foods should complement, not contradict each other.
  • Eating in a pleasant environment is preferable.
  • Eating should be paced properly (not too fast or slow).
  • Minimize distractions while eating.
  • Food should be eaten according to constitution.
  • Eat freshly prepared foods as much as possible. If you have to eat leftovers, make sure they are not more than a day old.
  • Avoid poor food combinations, such as very hot and very cold foods; raw and cooked food; milk and fish; or milk and meat.
  • Avoid microwave cooking. It disperses energy and is ultimately weakening over time. This has been scientifically and empirically proven.
  • Food should look and smell appetizing. Pleasant garnishes and attractive table settings help to instill a sense of harmony at the dinner table.
  • Drink spring or purified water. Avoid distilled water, which does not contain any minerals and has a tendency to accumulate them from your system. This weakens bones, teeth, hair, nails, and skin. However, various mineral formulations are nowadays available. These can be added to the distilled water to rectify this problem.
  • Try to get up early in the morning and drink two to three glasses of water the first thing in the morning. It is preferable to store the water in a copper pot on the previous night. It helps to remove toxins from the body. In winters you may warm this water.
  • Regular meditation, yoga and exercise are advisable. Exercise promotes circulation and helps to maintain the blood flow to every part of body. Exercise to half of your strength.
  • Proper rest and sound sleep are advisable.
  • Keep your mind relaxed.
  • Avoid keeping awake late into nights and try to get up early in morning.
  • Add morning and night walk to daily routine.
  • Avoid too hot and too cold temperature.

Specific guidelines:

Fasting is very effective treatment for dyspepsia as it helps to digest the ama and digestive system gets the required rest as it is not loaded with the food. After fasting, when patient is hungry, he should take light foods like mung dal soup, boiled vegetables like squash, bitter gourd, amla, radish and spices like cumin, ginger, black pepper, cilantro, fenugreek etc. Herbs used are hing (assafoetida), chitrak, vacha, Piper longum, Terminalia chebula, Emblica officinalis , Adhatoda vasica etc.

Flatulence is the presence of excessive air or gas in the stomach or intestines that bloats the organs. It may be an ordinary disease – eight out of ten people suffer from it – but it is an embarrassing situation to pass fowl-smelling gas with or without noise as it is considered a bad manner. Some people suppress this urge, but Ayurveda recommends this urge not be suppressed as doing so can give rise to many diseases.

Causes

Impaired digestion and poor absorption of foods in the small intestines cause flatulence. Certain conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, Crohn’s disease or colon cancer, may also cause flatulence. People with scar tissue (adhesions) from abdominal operations or internal hernias may have a sensation of bloating because of increased sensitivity to gas. Additionally, a diet that is low in fiber and a sedentary lifestyle cause indigestion or ama (mucus) formation leading to flatulence.

Symptoms

  • Belching and headache in some cases
  • Lethargy and dullness
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pain or feeling of heaviness in the abdomen

Ayurvedic View

Flatulence, known as Aadhaman in Ayurveda, is caused due to an imbalance of Vata and Pitta Dosha. Pitta is a humor that symbolizes heat or fire. It controls the digestive fire or jatharagni – the fire that helps digest foods. Vata is another humor, which symbolizes air or wind. Low Pitta Dosha and aggravated Vata Dosha result in low digestive fire, thus impairing digestion. Impaired digestion leads to flatulence.

The food we eat is digested by our digestive fire and is converted into nutrient plasma by a special mechanism. The nutrient plasma thus produced nourishes all other dhatus or body tissues. In case of impaired digestion, the body produces ama or toxins instead of healthy nutrient plasma. This ama forms a coating on the inner walls of the digestive gut, and aggravates Vata Dosha. Aggravated Vata leads to trapping of air in the digestive gut, which leads further to distension of the organs, thereby causing a state of flatulence.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Stick to a vata-pacifying, easily digestible and nutritious diet.
  • Avoid raw foods, even raw salads and sprouted beans and pulses.
  • Use vata-pacifying herbs like asafetida, celery seeds, cumin seeds and cardamom while cooking.
  • Avoid rice at night.
  • Whole wheat and brown rice are helpful.
  • Avoid tea, coffee, late night dinners, alcoholic beverages, aerated drinks, and fermented foods.

Always make sure you eat your food in calm and relaxing surroundings, without the disturbance of television or loud music. Food should be warm and freshly prepared and should be taken only when you feel hungry. Practice Vajrasan and Agnisaar Pranayam.

Gallstone formation is the most common disorder of the biliary tract. The process of formation of gallstones is called cholelithiasis in modern medicine. Though men and women both suffer from gallstones, their prevalence is much more in middle aged women. Also the people with obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes or genetic predisposition are more prone to suffer from gallstones. Gallstones usually occur in conjunction with cholecystitis which means inflammation of the wall of the gall bladder. Ayurveda refers to gallstones as pittashmari and has offered effective remedial measures against them.

Modern medicine has classified gallstones into three types viz. cholesterol stones, bile pigment stones and mixed stones. Their sizes can vary from few millimeters (like sand granules) to several centimeters (like a golf ball).

Causes

Formation of gallstones is caused mainly by congestion and obstruction in the flow of bile. Many factors like food habits, body weight and genetic predisposition undoubtedly play a role in formation of gallstones. Obesity and diabetes often increase cholesterol which in turn leads to cholesterol stone formation. Liver disorders such as fatty liver, cirrhosis and blood disorders such as sickle cell anaemia are many times responsible for bile pigment stone formation.

Genetic predisposition and food habits can form stones of any of the three types. Fatty, sweet and non-vegetarian foods are chiefly responsible for causing cholesterol stones, while spicy and fried items can mainly cause bile pigment stones. Combination of these food items can result in the formation of mixed type of stones. Estrogen hormone found in women’s body can increase cholesterol level. It can also decrease the motility of gallbladder causing stagnation of bile leading to stone formation. Hence, hormonal imbalance occurring during or after pregnancy and during or after menopause provides an ideal environment for the formation of gallstones.

Symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Flatulence and indigestion
  • Heartburn and abdominal pain

Ayurvedic View

According to Ayurveda, all three doshas viz. vata, pitta and kapha play a role in formation of gallstones. Excessive increase of pitta (caused by hot, spicy food, alcohol etc.) creates the basis for stone formation. Kapha increased by fatty, heavy foods mixes with pitta and produces a highly sticky mixture. Vata dries this mixture and moulds it into shape of a stone.

Ayurvedic treatment eliminates the need for surgery by assisting the body to expel the stones naturally. Treatment involves the use of highly effective stone dissolving (lithotriptic) herbal formulae along with herbs to cleanse the liver and restore its function.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

Since dietary factors often play a significant role in gallstone formation, following appropriate dietary regimen and lifestyle is of utmost importance. So following rules should be obeyed meticulously to prevent formation of gallstones and also to cure them:

  • Maintain proper food timings like breakfast before 9.30am, lunch before 1pm and dinner before 8.30pm. Late night meals and parties must be avoided.
  • Non-veg, fatty food, junk foods, sweets, chocolates, bread, cakes, milk products like curds, butter and khoya, carbonated drinks, alcohol must be strictly restricted.

Ringworm is a skin infection caused by a fungus. Ringworm can affect skin on your body (tinea corporis), scalp (tinea capitis), groin area (tinea cruris, also called jock itch), or feet (tinea pedis, also called athlete’s foot). Often, there are several patches of ringworm on your skin at once.

Causes

The ring worm infection, also known as tinea, is caused by fungi called dermatophytes and not by worms. The fungus can live off the dead tissues of skin, hair, and nails.

Symptoms

  • Itching
  • Red, circular patches on skin

 

Ayurvedic View

According to Ayurvedic philosophy this problem is diagnosed as “dadru”. The involved dosha is kapha- vata. Kapha is an Ayurvedic humour, which symbolizes mucus. It is cold, heavy, dense and sticky in nature. Vata is another Ayurvedic humour, which symbolizes air or wind. It is cold, dry, subtle and mobile. Kapha and vata dosha manifest in the skin and cause accumulation of toxins. These toxins accumulate in deeper tissues of skin like rasa (nutrient plasma), rakta, (blood), mansa (muscles) and lasika (lymphatic). These toxins cause contamination of deeper tissues. Contamination of deeper tissues and aggravation of kapha/vata dosha leads to ringworm.

Third involved dosha is pitta. Pitta is third dosha which symbolizes heat or fire. Thus it is tridoshaj disease, in which prime involved doshas are kapha and vata.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • One should avoid very fired, spicy, sour and excessive sweet foods. Citrus fruits (lemon, lime, orange), chutneys, sauces, pickled food, mustard and vinegar should be avoided.
  • One should avoid foods made up of white flour such as bread, cakes, pastries, pizza etc.
  • You should avoid artificial foods, fast foods, cola drinks. Tomatoes, excessive salt should be avoided.
  • Non- veg foods should be avoided completely.
  • Tea, coffee, alcohol and smoking are also pitta aggravating. Milk product like yogurt should be avoided. Rather than these foods stress on foods, which are sweet, blend, alkaline in nature.
  • Foods that should be included are grains, rice, pasta, beans, breads, dairy products, sweet drinks and juices. Fresh vegetables and fresh fruits should be taken.

Hyperacidity simply means an increased level of acid in the stomach. The stomach secretes Hydrochloric Acid, a digestive juice that breaks down food particles into their smallest form to aid digestion. When there is an excessive amount of hydrochloric acid in the stomach, the condition is known as Hyperacidity.

Causes

The main cause of hyperacidity is the aggravation of Pitta Dosha in the body. Pitta is an Ayurvedic humor that symbolizes heat or fire. There are many causes for the aggravation of Pitta, main among them are: Eating foods that do not suit the constitution or foods that should not be taken together (milk and fish, milk and salt), excessively sour or spicy foods and liquids, white flour products and white sugar products, smoking and excessive consumption of tea, coffee and alcohol, eating in a state of indigestion, suppressing urges of urination and stool, sleeping in the daytime after meals, staying awake late into the night, excessive stress, anger and hunger, excessive exposure to sun and heat and gastro-duodenal ulcer.

Symptoms

  • Stiffness in the stomach
  • Lack of appetite
  • Constipation
  • Indigestion
  • Sour belching
  • Actual vomiting
  • Feeling of restlessness

 

Ayurvedic View

Hyperacidity is known as Amlapitta in Ayurveda (Amla means sour and Pitta means heat). Hyperacidity therefore is a condition characterized by an increase of sourness and heat in the body. The aggravated Pitta impairs the digestive fire, leading to improper digestion of food and production of ama (toxins). This ama gets accumulated in the digestive channels and causes Hyperacidity.

The Ayurvedic treatment of Hyperacidity is focused on pacifying the aggravated Pitta Dosha. Cleansing herbs are also administered to eliminate toxins from the body and cleanse the channels. This automatically enhances the digestive fire, leading to better digestion.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Avoid tea, coffee, and carbonated or alcoholic beverages.
  • Avoid processed and fermented foods.
  • Avoid using garlic, ginger, onions, tomatoes, and vinegar in cooking.
  • Also avoid rich gravies, sour, salty, and spicy foods.
  • Curd should be strictly avoided at night.
  • Take meals in a relaxed atmosphere at regular intervals.

Practice Yoga and Pranayama such as Vajrasana, Bhujangasana, Salabhasana, Bhastrika Pranayama,Shitali Pranayama and Shitkari Pranayama.

Ulcerative Colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease, which causes inflammation and ulceration of inner lining of the colon and rectum. The inflammation usually begins in the rectum and spreads upward to the entire colon. This disease can occur at any age but its onset is most common among people between ages of 15 – 40. Ulcerative colitis also appears to run in some families.

Causes

Autoimmune factors, food allergies, collagen disorders, genetic factors and infection are some of the factors that cause inflammation in cases of Ulcerative Colitis. According to Ayurveda, all the factors that imbalance Pitta are responsible for this problem. These include eating while watching TV or walking, excessive heat or exposure of the sun, excessive alcohol and smoking, excessive mental activity, skipping meals, spicy, sour or stale and infected foods, etc.

Symptoms

  • Irregular bowel movements
  • Bluish or yellowish undigested stool
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Unexplained fatigue
  • Unpleasant body odor
  • Weight loss
  • Lack of appetite
  • Occasional rectal pain
  • Burning sensation in chest and throat

 

Ayurvedic View

Known as Pittaj Grahani in Ayurveda, Ulcerative Colitis is primarily a disease of Pitta Dosha, with varying degrees of Vata involvement in some cases. The excessive consumption of Pitta-aggravating foods and lifestyle initially damages both rakta dhatu (blood tissue) and mamsa dhatu (muscle tissue), leading to formation of ama that gets deposited between the villi in the intestines, forming a smooth coating that impairs the normal function and immunity of the intestines. Vata Dosha in the lower colon is also aggravated and in the early stages blocks the Pitta and Kapha channels, causing inflammation, mucous accumulation and edema.

Ayurvedic treatment of Ulcerative Colitis involves gently eliminating the ama, restoring healthy digestion and creating a bacterially-friendly environment in the body. After the basic strength and immunity of the body is restored, the treatment focuses on natural healing of the ulcers.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Have soup prepared by boiling split gram (split legumes), buttermilk, and yogurt prepared from skimmed milk and goat’s milk.
  • Increase use of cumin seeds, coriander, and celery seeds in cooking.
  • Avoid whole peas and beans, broccoli, potato, garlic, jaggery, yam, sweet potato and other indigestible foods; fried, oily and highly salted foods; and fermented and packaged foods.
  • Improve eating habits by having food in calm surroundings without watching television, listening to music, or working on the computer. Chew the food properly and completely. Eat slightly less than your appetite.
  • Avoid tea, coffee, and alcohol.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a very common digestive disorder that plagues innumerable people around the world. Scientific research has linked it to stress and worry but as yet the exact cause of the disease is unknown.

Causes

Stress and anxiety, infectious diarrhoea, excessive consumption of alcohol, caffeine or carbonated beverages and continued intolerance to lactose and/or gluten are often responsible for causing IBS.

Symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain and bloating
  • Anorexia
  • Headache and tiredness
  • Chronic constipation and/or diarrhea
  • Mucus / blood in stools

 

Ayurvedic View

Ayurveda describes many different digestive disorders that would fit into the category of IBS. Any of the body energies may be aggravated and toxins are usually present in such cases. Ayurvedic treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome involves alleviating the aggravated body energies, restoring the function of the digestive system and the elimination of accumulated toxins. As stress is often a significant cause of this disorder, an important line of treatment consists of lifestyle guidance and herbs to nourish the mind and nervous system.

Diet & Lifestyle Advice

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables as well as fruit juices should be consumed to reduce the amount of inflammation in the lining of the stomach.
  • Avoid consumption of caffeine, alcohol and carbonated beverages.
  • If gas is a problem for you, you might want to avoid foods that tend to make gas worse, including beans, cabbage and citrus fruits.
  • Some Home Remedies
  • Drink ginger tea or chew raw ginger to reduce inflammation caused by Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
  • Prepare tea by boiling one teaspoon of flaxseed in a cup of water. Drink it at night.
  • Take one teaspoon of Psyllium Husks (Isabgol) with half cup of fresh yogurt one hour after dinner.

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